WESH 2 Investigates: Hyundai Kia Lawsuit Settlement Affects 3.1 Million Vehicles – WESH 2 Orlando | CarTailz

A federal lawsuit has led to a settlement whereby Korean automakers Kia and Hyundai will provide compensation or extended warranties for 3.1 million vehicles that are or have been at risk of fire. Owners should begin receiving instructional and important information related to their vehicles in three months. These vehicles have anti-lock braking system modules that can spontaneously cause engine fires. News of the settlement follows a November 10 fire in Ocala at the home of John and Joanne Donaldson. Their 2014 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport began burning at 8 p.m. after seeing brake warning lights earlier in the day. Fire investigators wrote in an initial report that the fire started in the engine. It spread, destroying much of their home and another vehicle next to the Hyundai in the carport. John Donaldson said he was glad neither he nor three others in the home were hurt. “I think we were just thankful in that moment that we didn’t sleep a little bit later or be in the drive earlier and felt very protected by God — that God was watching over us at that moment,” he said. It is the fourth home in central Florida to burn in recent years when a Kia or Hyundai spontaneously caught fire. In 2019, Betty Davis’ Kia SUV and her Deltona home caught fire, causing injuries that took her to a hospital. Later that year, Brenda and Johnny Lwin’s Kia burned down their car, home, and an RV. Earlier this year Earlier this year, Susan Sherer fled her Titusville home when her Hyundai burned her garage and part of her home. The Donaldsons’ vehicle had already been inspected for a 2020 recall in which the anti-lock brakes posed a fire hazard, with owners saying they ” park” should be ide and away from structures. “But the Donaldsons say they never got that notification. “Yes, we were pissed off,” John Donaldson said. Their home is uninsured and currently uninhabitable. They received an insurance check for the Hyundai, and now WESH has 2 investigates learn they may receive more financial relief as a result of the recent legal settlement in California District Court over the anti-lock brake system fire hazard.”We take these safety concerns very seriously,” said Jonathan Lindenfeld, attorney for the law firm FeganScott, which is handling the settlement Affected Kia and Hyundai vehicles cover model years 2006-2021 Owners will be reimbursed for losses at full black book value If insurance has already paid owners but they have incurred a deductible it will be covered, as will any associated with the fire repairs, rental car expenses and towing. Incidents, owners of vehicles still under warranty will receive a seven-year extension, and for those not under warranty, a five-year extension just for the ABS brake module. “We will re-educate millions of people about this deficiency to ensure their vehicles are repaired and no longer a safety risk and they are entitled to all the benefits of this settlement,” Lindenfeld said. The Donaldsons plan to file a separate lawsuit against Hyundai to cover the damage to the home. Kia and Hyundai vehicle owners affected by the settlement will receive notification in the mail starting in February with full instructions on how to assert their claims do and accept.

A federal lawsuit has led to a settlement whereby Korean automakers Kia and Hyundai will pay compensation or extend warranties for 3.1 million vehicles that are or have been at risk of fire.

Owners should receive communications with instructions and important information about their vehicles within three months.

These vehicles have anti-lock braking system modules that can spontaneously cause engine fires.

News of the settlement follows a November 10 fire in Ocala at the home of John and Joanne Donaldson.

Their 2014 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport began burning at 8 p.m. after seeing brake warning lights earlier in the day.

Fire investigators wrote in an initial report that the fire broke out in the engine. It spread, destroying much of their home and another vehicle next to the Hyundai in the carport. John Donaldson said he was glad neither he nor three others in the home were hurt.

“I think we were just thankful in that moment that it wasn’t a little bit later than we were sleeping, or earlier while we were driving like this and feeling very protected by God – that God was watching over us at that moment,” he said .

It is the fourth home in central Florida to burn in recent years when a Kia or Hyundai spontaneously caught fire.

In 2019, Betty Davis’ Kia SUV caught fire, setting her home in Deltona on fire and causing injuries that took her to a hospital. Later that year, Brenda and Johnny Lwin’s Kia burned the car, their home, and an RV.

Earlier this year, Susan Sherer fled her home in Titusville when her Hyundai burned down her garage and part of her home.

The Donaldsons’ vehicle had previously been inspected for a 2020 recall in which the anti-lock brakes posed a fire hazard.

They discovered after the fire that there was another recall citing a “fire risk when parking” and asking owners to “park outside and away from buildings.”

But the Donaldsons say they never got that message.

“Yes, we were angry,” said John Donaldson. Your home is uninsured and currently uninhabitable.

They received an insurance check for the Hyundai, and now WESH 2 Investigates has learned that the recent legal settlement in California Circuit Court may give them more financial relief.

The settlement brings together three separate lawsuits dating back to August 2020 addressing the anti-lock braking system fire risk.

“We take these safety concerns very seriously,” said Jonathan Lindenfeld, attorney for the law firm FeganScott, which is handling the settlement.

The 3.1 million Kia and Hyundai vehicles affected cover the 2006-2021 model years.

In the event of a fire, owners are reimbursed for losses at full black book value.

If insurance has already paid the owners but they have incurred a deductible, it is covered. There are also repairs, rental car costs and towing in connection with the fire.

For non-fire events, owners of vehicles still under warranty will receive a seven-year extension and those not under warranty will receive a five-year extension, just for the ABS brake module.

“We will re-educate millions of people about this deficiency to ensure their vehicles are repaired and no longer a safety risk and they are entitled to all the benefits of this settlement,” Lindenfeld said.

The Donaldsons plan to file a separate lawsuit against Hyundai to cover the damage to the home.

Kia and Hyundai vehicle owners affected by the settlement will receive a notification in the mail beginning in February with full instructions on how to make and accept their claims.

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