I-Team: Speed ​​Cameras Making Drivers Slow Down on JFX – WBAL TV Baltimore | CarTailz

COLLINS HAS A LOOK AT THE TICKETS ISSUED. DAVID: THE 11 NEWS I TEAM HAS ISSUED DATA FROM THE FIRST 60 DAYS OF THE TICKETS. OPPOSITE WARNING. , THE TICKETS HAVE AN EFFECT. FROM JULY 13 TO SEPTEMBER 10, 79,000 99 QUOTES WERE EXHIBITED. THIS MEANS AN AVERAGE 1318 TICKETS PER DAY. THIS IS FROM THE TRIAL PERIOD WHERE AN AVERAGE OF 2800 46 QUOTES WERE ISSUED EVERY DAY. >> PEOPLE RIDE IT LIKE THE SUPERSPEEDWAY. THEY DON’T DO THAT ANY MORE. DAVID: COUNCILMAN JAMES TORRENCE, WHOSE DISTRICT COVERS PART OF THE HIGHWAY, SAYS LOWER SPEEDS MEANS FEWER FALLS AND FEWER SERVICE CALLS. >> ONCE THE NORTHERN DISTRICT CALLS 500 SERVICE ONLY FOR 83 AND CAR ACCIDENT AND ACCIDENTS. SO NOW IMAGINE THAT WE HAVE OFFICERS FREE TO GO ON WITH THE WORK WE NEED THEM DAILY. DAVID: TRANSPORT OFFICERS SAY THAT MOST TICKETS ARE ISSUED BETWEEN 2PM AND 7PM, WHICH COVERS EVENING RUSH HOUR TRAFFIC. >> I’M SLOWING DOWN ON THE SLOW LANE. >> I THINK IT WAS A VERY GOOD CHOICE BECAUSE YOU KNOW PEOPLE NO LONGER RIDE UP AND DOWN ONE OF THE MOST BUSY HIGHWAYS IN THE STATE. IT IS GREAT. DAVID: THE FASTEST DRIVER WAS TRAPPED WHILE GOING 130 MPH. >> THERE ARE PEOPLE WHO DON’T CARE, THEY BELIEVE IT’S A RACETRACK. I’M TALKING TO THEM NOW, PLEASE CHANGE YOUR BEHAVIOR. THERE IS ONE LIFE YOU SAVE. NOT JUST YOUR OWN BUT SOMEONE ELSE. DAVID: TICKETS REVENUE DURING FIRST 60 DAYS EXCEEDS $3 MILLION. STATE LAW REQUIRES THAT MONEY BACK IS RELEASED INTO MAINTENANCE AND REPAIR OF THE ROADWAY.

I-Team: Speed ​​cameras force drivers to slow down on JFX

It seems that speed cameras on the Jones Falls Expressway are making people slow down in Baltimore. Data from speed camera cards issued in the first 60 days since the system went live shows progress, but tens of thousands of drivers are still speeding. Compared to the warning period that preceded the issuing of subpoenas, the cameras are having an impact. The system was launched in April and 79,099 citations were issued in the first 60 days of ticketing from July 13 to September 10. That’s an average of about 1,318 tickets per day, down from the trial period when there was an average of 2,846 summonses being issued each day. Baltimore City Councilor James Torrence, D-District 7, which includes part of the freeway, said slower speeds mean fewer accidents and 911 calls. “Once the Northern Circuit (Baltimore Police Department) had more than 500 service calls just for (Interstate) 83 and auto crashes and accidents. So imagine we now have officers who are free now to get on with the work we have to do every day,” Torrence said. Baltimore City Department of Transportation officials told 11 News that most tickets between 14: 00 and 19:00, covering evening rush hour traffic. The fastest driver was being tracked at 130 mph “Your own but someone else’s,” Torrence said. Revenue from tickets issued in the first 60 days will exceed $3 million. State law requires money to be used for roadway maintenance and repairs.

It seems that speed cameras on the Jones Falls Expressway are making people slow down in Baltimore.

Data from speed camera cards issued in the first 60 days since the system was activated show progress has been made, but tens of thousands of drivers are still speeding.

Compared to the warning period that preceded the issuance of subpoenas, the cameras are having an impact. The system was launched in April and 79,099 citations were issued in the first 60 days of ticketing from July 13 to September 10. That’s an average of about 1,318 tickets per day, down from the trial period when there was an average of 2,846 citations per day.

Baltimore City Councilman James Torrence, D-District 7, whose district includes part of the freeway, said slower speeds mean fewer accidents and service calls.

“Once the Northern District (Baltimore Police Department) had more than 500 911 calls just for (Interstate) 83 and auto crashes and accidents. So imagine we now have officers who are now free to get on with the work that we have to do every day,” Torrence said.

Officials with the Baltimore City Department of Transportation told 11 News that most tickets are issued between 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., which covers evening rush hour traffic. The fastest driver was followed at 130 mph.

“There are people who don’t care. They still believe it’s a racetrack. I’m telling them now, please change your behavior because you’re saving a life – not just your own, but someone else’s.” Torrence said.

Revenue from tickets issued in the first 60 days will exceed $3 million. State law requires money to be used for roadway maintenance and repairs.

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